Pre-Conference Workshops

Working with LDAR Data Using Open Source GIS Software
Instructor:Colin Gowens & Sara Yurman

Date: October 3rd, 2016
Length: Full Day
Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm
Location: Athens Classic Center

Description:  This workshop will explore and describe LiDAR data structure, data available from recent and future Georgia LiDAR  acquisitions, software resources, and methodologies to store and use LiDAR data. Two powerful Open Source software packages will be the focus for instruction on how to work with LiDAR.  Postgres is a relational database system with spatial capabilities.  PostGIS  has the capabilities to work with millions of records associated with LiDAR.  qGIS is desktop GIS software that has a solid tool set to visualize LiDAR data and to create surfaces for analysis.  Students of this class will gain a better understanding of LiDAR data, resources for Georgia LiDAR data, and software and skills required to store and utilize LiDAR.

Introduction to Rest
Instructor:  Zac Miller

Date: October 3rd, 2016
Length: Half Day
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Location: Athens Classic Center

Workshop Description: An introduction to Representational State Transfer (REST) and its application to geospatial data. Further leverage your geospatial skills by using Python web framework Django and the Django-Rest-Framework to create a web based interface to geospatial data. The database backend for our data will be Postgres/PostGIS and creation and setup of the Postgres/PostGIS server will be covered. Attendees are encouraged to bring a laptop computer with a newer (>2.10) version of QGIS (http://www.qgis.org/en/site/) and beginner to intermediate level of Python programming skills are suggested.

GIS and Next Generation 9-1-1
Instructor: Sandi Stroud

Date: October 3rd, 2016
Length: Half Day
Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
Location: Athens Classic Center

Workshop Description: This workshop is aimed at the GIS professional who is currently supporting or may support their emergency communications division in the future. In a fully operational next generation 911 system, GIS is the core component in determining how a 911 call is routed to the correct public safety answering point (PSAP). This will have profound impact on local maintenance workflows, local data access, and data fidelity. We recognize there is a sincere lack of education available aimed at the GIS professional who may not be as versed with the 911 terminology or needs. This workshop is intended to provide an overview of next generation 911, GIS role in such a system, the implications on local workflows, and illustrate common pain points and sources of errors in local GIS datasets.

  • Become familiar with basic next generation 911 terminology and concepts
  • Recognize GIS role in a fully operation next generation 911 system
  • Understand implications on local GIS workflows to meet the demands of a next generation 911 system
  • Begin to understand immediate steps that can be taken in preparing GIS assets for Next Generation 911

Emergency Preparedness for GIS

Date: October 3rd, 2016
Length: Half Day
Time: 1:00pm – 5:00pm
Location: Athens Classic Center

Workshop Description: As GIS goes from being a silo technology in an organization to an integrated enterprise solution, there is a pressing need for cross training on the non-technical disciplines GIS staff is being asked to support. Specifically, public safety (emergency management, police and fire services) and the ridged work flows which accompany their daily duties, often prove foreign to those unfamiliar with these specific disciplines. In order to accommodate their needs in a time-sensitive situation, out experience is that by taking the ‘GIS’ out of the analyst-emergency responder relationship is the best approach. The key is to arm the GIS professional with enough knowledge so they can effectively discern the needs of the incident commander and quickly produce the spatial document(s) which best support decision making in an emergency.

This workshop is divided into a two part structure:

First, an overview of the incident command structure and the national incident management system. We will briefly discuss common situations specific to each discipline and show case studies/examples of how GIS is used to support each. We will also discuss relevant data sets to public safety and suggestions for the integration of GIS into their organizations disaster preparedness planning.

The second part of the workshop will include an interactive emergency technology table exercise with participants from the audience and provide take away knowledge that can be implemented in their own organizations.

Introduction to GNSS
Instructor:  Tripp Corbin

Date: October 3rd, 2016
Length: Full Day
Time: 8:00am – 5:00pm
Location: Athens Classic Center

Workshop Description: The use of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has become pervasive in the GIS and Surveying communities, and with anyone who needs or collects data that has a geographic or locational component. Local, state and federal agencies regularly use it for a myriad of purposes including E911, utility locations, pavement inventories, biological studies and more. In the private sector, surveyors, GIS data collectors and other consultants use GNSS in their everyday work. Even hikers, boaters and hunters rely on GNSS to document their fishing holes, hunting blinds and to leave virtual bread crumb trails. This data finds its way into thousands of different databases and maps and is used in every conceivable application. GNSS is a highly specialized technology that, by its very nature, is prone to accidental misapplication; and it will produce inaccurate results that are not recognized to the untrained user. This workshop will, in a non-technical, yet thorough manner, explore the GNSS satellite constellations, how geographic positions are determined, sources of errors in GNSS data collection, and the types of receivers with the goal of arming users with the ability to achieve the results they expect and need in their work. Specific topics include:

  • The Global Navigation Satellite System – satellites, control and receivers
  • How GNSS works – Measurements from 12,000 miles up
  • Latitude and Longitude
  • Factors affecting the accuracy of GNSS measurements
  • Determining the accuracy of my GNSS measurements
  • How to obtain more accurate results
  • Types of GPS receivers
  • Methods of making GNSS measurements – Static, Rapid Static, RTK
  • GPS, GLONASS and other Global Navigation Satellite

ArcGIS Online
Instructor:  Joshua Knight

Date: October 3rd, 2016
Length: Half Day
Time: 8:00am – 12:00pm
Location: Athens Classic Center

Workshop Description:  Esri’s ArcGIS Online is a Cloud-based GIS Solution that provides a robust platform for sharing geospatial data with users both inside and outside of your organization. ArcGIS Online allows you to share data, maps, tools and applications via the web using this Esri hosted solution. Every group or organization that uses ArcGIS for Desktop and is under current maintenance can make use of this power tool from Esri.

The key to getting the most out of any tool or technology is knowing how to use it and what it can do. This one day class will introduce students to the fundamentals of using ArcGIS Online. You will learn how to add content, create and customize maps, and share your content with those in and outside your organization.

Target Audience:  This course is designed for those that have experience using Esri’s ArcGIS Desktop tools that want to learn more about how they can leverage ArcGIS Online to share the data and maps they create with others both inside and outside the organization.

Prerequisites and recommendations:  Students taking this course should have have at least one year of experience using ArcGIS Desktop.

Students will also need administrative access to an ArcGIS Online Organizational account. If you are not sure if your organization has an ArcGIS Online account, please contact your Esri Account Rep. or you can sign up for a 30 Free Trial from Esri.

 Click here to sign up for a free 30 day trial of ArcGIS Online.

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Hard Working Cat Says “GIS is Hard – Take a Workshop!”